Cover of: The culture of the Meiji period | Irokawa, Daikichi

The culture of the Meiji period

  • 320 Pages
  • 3.62 MB
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  • English
by
Princeton University Press , Princeton, N.J
Japan -- Civilization -- 1868-

Places

StatementIrokawa Daikichi ; translation edited by Marius B. Jansen.
SeriesPrinceton library of Asian translations
Classifications
LC ClassificationsDS822.3 .I7613 1985
The Physical Object
Paginationxvi, 320 p. ;
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL2867526M
ISBN 100691066345
LC Control Number84042889

This book offered a very different, almost counter cultural portrayal of the Meiji Restoration period of Japan. It did not focus on its aready well known 'heroes:' the former samurai, intellectuals, and other elite figures who led the country in its determined efforts to gain acceptance by the Western powers in the late 19th and very early 20th centuries/5.

The Meiji Period was one of intense social, political and cultural change in Japan. Most histories deal with it through the eyes of the intellectuals and prominent writers, which tends to miss out the common people, such as farmers, local village leaders and so by: The culture of the Meiji period.

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--Abandoning Conventional Morality --The Clash of Ideas at the Lower Social Level --From Peak to Valley --Carriers of Meiji Culture --The Establishment of the Japanese Intellectual Class --Opening the Eye to the Inner Life --Views of Civilization --Meiji Conditions of Nonculture "This book, a translation.

The description for this book, The Culture of the Meiji Period, will be forthcoming. Jiyuto Kido Kido Takayoshi Kitamura Tokoku kokutai Konminto Kumoi Tatsuo kyodotai leaders Learning liberal lived Maruyama masses Meiji culture Meiji government Meiji period Meiji Restoration ment minken modern Japan mountain village Nihon Nishi Tama Onuma.

The description for this book, The Culture of the Meiji Period, will be forthcoming. "This The culture of the Meiji period book, a translation of Irokawa's classic Meiji no Bunka, is best described as an analysis of popular political consciousness in the Meiji period and its corruption by the Emperor System the translation is lucid and seamless, a remarkable.

This book, a translation of Irokawa's classic Meiji no Bunka, is best described as an analysis of popular political consciousness in the Meiji period and its corruption by the Emperor System the translation is lucid and seamless, a remarkable achievement given the number of Author: Daikichi Irokawa.

Book Review: Irokawa Daikichi’s The Culture of the Meiji Period Ap Posted by Jeremy W. Richter History Irokawa Daikichi’s work The Culture of the Meiji Period (Amazon) dissects its subject in a much more negative light than others who have studied the same period.

"This book, a translation of Irokawa's classic Meiji no Bunka, is best described as an analysis of popular political consciousness in the Meiji period and its corruption by the Emperor System Irokawa Daikichi is an indefatigable researcher, and the fruits of his own and others' labors on back roads and in old storehouses are amply.

This book, a translation of Irokawa's classic Meiji no Bunka, is best described as an analysis of popular political consciousness in the Meiji period and its corruption by the Emperor System the translation is lucid and seamless, a remarkable achievement given the number of Price: $   The Meiji period that followed the Restoration was an era of major political, economic, and social change in Japan.

The reforms enacted during the Meiji emperor’s rule brought about the modernization and Westernization of the country and paved the way for Japan to become a major international power. Meiji restoration, The term refers to both the events of that led to the "restoration" of power to the emperor and the entire period of revolutionary changes that coincided with the Meiji emperor's reign (–).

The power of the Tokugawa shogunate, weakened by debt and internal division, had declined, and much opposition had built up in the early 19th cent. The Meiji period was a time of political and social revolution. Irokawa Daikichi’s work The Culture of the Meiji Period (Amazon) dissects its subject in a much more.

The Meiji era (明治, Meiji, Japanese pronunciation: [meꜜː(d)ʑi]) is an era of Japanese history which extended from Octo to J This era represents the first half of the Empire of Japan, during which period the Japanese people moved from being an isolated feudal society at risk of colonisation by European powers to the new paradigm of a modern, industrialised nation.

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The empress of Japan set them the task to bring back the methods needed to jumpstart women’s education in Japan. The youngest, Umeko Tsuda, was just six years old at the time.

For Janice Nimura this episode encapsulates the topsy-turvy nature of the Meiji Period (), noting that the effects of Eastern and Western cultural currents. The inhabitants of Japan experienced a long period of relative isolation from the outside world for over years during the Tokugawa shogunate until the arrival of the "Black Ships" and the Meiji period.

Today, the culture of Japan stands as one of the leading and most prominent cultures around the world, mainly due to the global reach of its. "This book, a translation of Irokawa's classic Meiji no Bunka, is best described as an analysis of popular political consciousness in the Meiji period and its corruption by the Emperor System the translation is lucid and seamless, a remarkable achievement given the number of contributors who worked on it."--L.

Cornell, Pacific Affairs "A fascinating account of aspects of Japanese /5(20). Woodblock Kuchi-e Prints: Reflections of Meiji Culture is a pioneer exploration of a previously neglected genre of late-Meiji art: the type of handmade multicolor book frontispieces known as kuchi-e.

Early European collectors assumed that the Japanese woodblock tradition came to 5/5(1). The Meiji period saw incredible social transformation.

One of the these was the virtually bloodless end of the aristocratic warrior class known as the samurai. For generations, these men had lorded their status over farmers, merchants, and craftsmen.

: The Culture of the Meiji Period (Princeton Library of Asian Translations) () by Irokawa, Daikichi and a great selection of similar New, Used and Collectible Books available now at great prices/5(19). The Western ideal of individualism had a pervasive influence on the culture of the Meiji period in Japan ().

Janet Walker argues that this ideal also had an important influence on the development of the modern Japanese by: Abstract: This book addresses how gender became a defining category in the political and social modernization of Japan. During the early decades of the Meiji period (–), the Japanese encountered an idea with great currency in the West: that the social position of women reflected a country’s level of civilization.

the Meiji Period with a parliamentary form of government and as a world power through military expansion abroad. The Meiji regime first began as an alliance between Satsuma and Choshu, the two domains responsible for the overthrowing of the Tokugawa Shogunate, with support from Tosa and Hizen domains as well.

Satsuma and ChoshuFile Size: 38KB.

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The description for this book, The Culture of the Meiji Period, will be forthcoming. OverDrive (Rakuten OverDrive) Borrow eBooks, audiobooks, and videos from thousands of public libraries worldwide. This book is a first step in recovering that history. In so doing, we increase our understanding of the history of Japanese tea culture, the position of women in Edo-period society, and the history behind the growth of women’s tea practice in modern Japan.

Rebecca Corbett, Cultivating Femininity: Women and Tea Culture in Edo and Meiji Japan. The Meiji Restoration means the emergence of a true modern spirit in Japanese culture, but since it was impossible to catch up with Western modern culture immediately, the whole period was one of confusion, wherein the past was being sloughed off at the same time that elements of the Ancient, Medieval, and Modern Eras of the West were introduced.

Images by Toyohara Chikanobu (豊原周延) (–), better known to his contemporaries as Yōshū Chikanobu (楊洲周延), a prolific woodblock artist of Japan’s Meiji period. The appearance of Western clothing and fashion during the Meiji era ( ) represents one of the most remarkable transformations in Japanese history.

The Culture of the Meiji Period by Daikichi Irokawa and a great selection of related books, art and collectibles available now at - The Culture of the Meiji Period Princeton Library of Asian Translations by Irokawa, Daikichi - AbeBooks.

By the beginning of the Meiji period, print culture in Japanese cities had been flourishing for well over a century. Pre-Meiji prints feature brightly colored images of actors, courtesans, and scenic views, but the Meiji period’s dramatic social, political, and cultural changes provided a wealth of new subjects for printmakers to capture.

Women and Public Life in Early Meiji Japan focuses on women’s activities in the new public spaces of Meiji Japan. With chapters on public, private, and missionary schools for girls, their students, and teachers, on social and political groups women created, on female employment, and on women’s participation in print media, this book offers a new perspective on nineteenth- and early.

Book Description: The Western ideal of individualism had a pervasive influence on the culture of the Meiji period in Japan (). Janet Walker argues that this ideal also had an important influence on the development of the modern Japanese novel.

Cultivating Femininity: Women and Tea Culture in Edo and Meiji Japan, by Rebecca Corbett, and Gathering for Tea in Modern Japan: Class, Culture and Consumption in the Meiji Period, by Taka Oshikiri, contribute to the recent trend in Japanese tea ceremony historiography of recovering the multiplicity of tea practices and practitioners beyond the canonized histories of great men and grand Author: Kristin Surak.Daikichi Irokawa is the author of The Culture of the Meiji Period ( avg rating, 20 ratings, 1 review, published ), Age of Hirohito ( avg rati /5.The Japanese Novel of the Meiji Period and the Ideal of Individualism.

Princeton University Press, Janet A. Walker. The Western ideal of individualism had a pervasive influence on the culture of the Meiji period in Japan (), as well as on the development of the novel, a form imported from author begins by examining the evolution of a literary concept of the inner self.